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20121116
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
of fiscal resources and the state of our economy. i'm not a foreign policy guy or a strategic guy, but that seems, obviously, right to me. if you can't aboard the kind of military you need to project power, if you can't afford to fund the state department in the kinds of ways it should be doing, no matter how many people we have or how wealthy some of our citizens are. i don't worry, if you don't mind my digressing slightly, i don't worry about china being a bigger economy than we are. i don't honestly care how big china is. they do have three-and-a-half times more people than we do. i'm more concerned with how big we are -- >> how big or how rich? >> well, i put them in the same -- rich being gdp. how successful are we economically. um, and so i do think it is, i think resolving the fiscal thing is of essential importance to our business community in terms of deciding how much they're going to spend, where they're going to invest, how many people they're going to hire and, therefore, to our position in the world. not just the problem of our debt and deficit, but unless we, unless
happens less than a year later. and the foreign policy effects and the economic effects which we are still living. so we don't really know because history's like this what the real number one foreign policy is going to be. we can guess. we have educated guesses but things happen that we don't anticipate. that's where the arab spring. september 11 and its implicatns. wouljust argue that's why the character of whoever wins this election is so important. foreign policy, as clinical as we want it to be in many ways is a human undertaking. >> rose: this is very important. what do you mean by character. help us understand what character has to do in terms of what are we talking about. character with respect to the presidency. >> i think we saw in 2001 we had a president who had a stubborn streak, who had, was in a way radicalized by events in the autumn of 2001. >> rose: 9/11. >> he was against nation building before he was in favor of it. and because of the effects of that we are living in a world which is radically different. the great example would be world war ii where fdr said i'm a jugul
do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
to be resolved around a more foreign policy guidance. the way it works now, let's change, since my day, is we used to sit down with people from the state department usually the deputy secretary, once or twice here and say what's on your mind, what you think of the important countries we should be concentrating on? i hope that when i was undersecretary there was more conversation, but there's no real guidance. and i think that there needs to be. the second thing there needs to be absolutely is a we organization of the bbg. the bbg has now have agency. there's no ceo eric one of the strangest organizations in all of the federal government. the board itself is the head of agency, and the chair really has no more power than any of the other governors. it's kind of a zion to run the show. and by the way, i'm not sure, as the chair, the new chair -- >> nominated. >> nominate, that's all. this is the way that administration's and congress treat this organization, where more money spent on public diplomacy as far as we know them in any other program. doesn't even have a full complement of governors.
style. often foreign policy, and as you know, fareed, again and again presidents spend more time on foreign policy than they do on domestic policy than they do in the skornld term. >> so when you're reading the election results, clearly the president was re-elect because of minorities, particularly hispanics. do you think that should mean we should not be surprised to see very prominent pointing of hispanics? ? is that one that begins to play immediately? >> i think that what you'll see really an emphasis from this president is on immigration reform. i think you'll see it on the republican side. i think they're ready to deal and come forward with immigration reform. but i think what's important to hispanic voters is whoo can he do on education reform, keep the costs of college down, what can he do to get jobs growing and try to find a way forward, again, in this gridlock city. i think you'll see a big emphasis on that early. and i think he'll be successful because th republicans are ready to deal on it now. >> i think they would put up a grand bargain and come to him first. i thi
still, president obama, i think, has been cautious with foreign policy, we have a divided government, and we have to take care of the fiscal cliff that's looming, and that's the first order of business. not making any predigses, but i think it's just useful to see where we are, and i think the election results do have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in the report. i'll turn it over to peter, manuel, and margaret for their summary remarks. >> thank you. great introduction. let me start, and, in fact, i want to focus on the visit at the end of the month which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election has had any keep of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america thinks about the u.s.. it's an important meeting for both presidents k become somewhat routine now for the president-elect of mexico to come toñ&r the united states bee the inauguration. calderÓn did, and i don't remember back further, but -- >> [inaudible] >> i was too young then. [laughter] in any event, the visit,
have agreed to draft a joint pledge for economic and foreign policies. the move is part of their plan to field a single candidate. the democratic united party candida candidates disclosed the drafts as different venues. >> translator: i will ask them to talk to with the details about the policy as soon as possible. >> translator: we will discuss ways to field a single candidate to realize a change of government. that is what the people want. >> moon and ahne held a phone conference, and agreed to sbree grate their campaign processes and begin talks on how to choose a single candidate. they will explain their views this week. the two nominees plan to unite against park. she's leading the polls ahead of next month's election. >>> south korean lawmakers have decided to spend more on a public relations campaign for a group of disputed islands. south korea controls the islands in the sea of japan. south kor japanese lay claim to the territory they call takeshima. members of a foreign affairs committee decided to tripled budget to about $5.7 million. they say the money will be used to consu
an audience. you know, when you are the president's foreign policy spokesman and you are hanging out and have the israeli prime minister and then the chairman trying to reach a middle east peace, you go, okay, what we tell the press? and you say, you can tell them whatever you want except for this and that. and what else is there? [laughter] but now we have dennis ross was out of government. and he is writing a new book. when you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with iran, whether the nuclear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. in 2009 when you were at the state department as the special envoy forswore wrong, there was a strategy of both engagement and pressure. going back to 2009 there is the engagement that has continued at a certain level through the five plus one process, but then there has been focused over the last couple of years on pressure sanctions and the 40% drop in iranian currency shows that we now have the pressure of the last couple
to expect the unexpected in a second term. often on foreign policy. and as you know, fareed, again and again presidents eventually spend more time on foreign policy than they do on domestic policy in the second term. >> so when you're reading the election results, to bear david's admonition in mind, john podesta, clearly the president was re-elected because of minorities, particularly hispanics. do you think that will mean we should not be surprised to see very prominent appointment of hispanic americans or things like that? is that calculus one that begins to play immediately? >> well, i think what you'll see really an emphasis from this president on is on immigration reform. i think you'll see it in the personnel side, but i think really it's going to go to the substance. i think republicans are back on their heels, having really gotten clobbered amongst latino voters. and i think they're ready to deal and i think you'll see them come forward with immigration reform. but i think as important to hispanic voters is going to be what can he do on education reform, what can he do to keep the co
not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we take or are the re-- reactions that are going to be caused by our actions actually going to cause greater threats to our closest allies and to ourselves? unfortunately, that's what we're seeing. in fact, i had seen an article in may of 2010 that indicated that this administration, the obama administration, sided with israel's enemies in demanding that israel disclose any nuclear weapons. we had never sided with israel's enemies in trying to push israel into doing something against its own interests. when you're a very small country surrounded by countries that want to see you go away, it is important that they not know all of your defenses. going back in the old testament, you find history, king his kaija -- king hezekiah showing all the defenses they had in their armory he showed them to the leaders from babylon. as a resu
hill, the prime minister should make a speech about foreign-policy. let me say at the outset that this is a government that is outward looking, standing up for interest in the world, protecting security at home and promoting our values abroad. we spoke up for the arabs bring. we led international action to support the libyan people and getting rid of muammar gaddafi. we stepped up the use sanctions against iran, and at the forefront of efforts to isolate assad in syria. we've got us out of the bailout fund and rejecting the treaty that was not of interest. i am a prime minister who said even in tough economic times of britain will not break its promises to the poorest of our world. i am sharing the united nations high-level panel of development with ambition of eradicating absolute poverty in our world. i am a prime minister who will work closely with president obama in a renewed effort on the middle east peace process, and let us congratulate him tonight on winning a historic second term. yes, i am a prime minister who will -- you will bring troops home from afghanistan. let
of the years, never before an audience. [laughter] when you are the president's foreign-policy spokesman and handing out in the roosevelt room as you have the israeli prime minister and then chairman arafat and the president trying to reach middle east piece you go and say, okay. but we tell the press. look, you can tell them what everyone except for this, this, and this. what else is there? but now we have the dennis two is out of the government. and writing a new book. so if you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with ron, then the clear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those, if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. so start off, in 2009 when you were at the state department's as the special envoy for ron there was a strategy, both engagement. go back to 2009. the engagement has continued at a certain level, but then there has been the focus over the last couple of years on pressure, sanctions, and clearly the 40% drop in the value of a running currencies shows that actually is having t
consumption led growth model. >> and is it going to comatethe perhaps its biggest and foreign policy challenge will be the middle east, is going to potentially be iran? >> absolutely. what can we do make them be more constructive there, not support iran, but to lead to a change there. >> phil, thanks for that. he's written loads of books. let's show where you we stand with the u.s. futures right now ahead of this particular market. right new pretty flat the open for the s&p 500. the nasdaq is around five points above fair value and at the moment, we are five points below fair value for the dow. so looks fairly flat. european stocks down most of the session. bond yeeds certainyields certai looking at. >> if we look at the bond space, we can get a sense of why the italian ten year, this is the one to watch breaching the 5% level today. it has come down a little bit from the session high. perhaps indicating something of a floor below the market levels that we're seeing this morning. but certainly one to watch as we continue to gauge fallout across the eurozone as to whether greece ahead of budget
of course continuously focused on his foreign policy and national security agenda. he has great confidence in the acting cia director, confidence in his military and the second of defense and the defense department to carry out the missions that he's assigned to them. but he's got obviously a lot that he wants to get to work on and he's doing that this week. >> broadly, how does this affect the national security team? >> i think these are specific questions about specific individuals and posts. i can say now, even though you haven't asked, i have no announcemented to make with regards to personnel and no speculation to engage in. i can tell you that the president has not made a decision on personnel matters and you will not hear me discuss them until the president has made those decisions and has announced them. >> regarding two specific people you can't extrapolate but two of the president's top military brass either involved in an extramarital affair or inappropriate behavior. is the president worried about a culture, inappropriate culture in the military? >> i really would ask you to no
from the increasingly vocal feminists who demanded more of a role in government policy. she was a woman he could trust to do only what he expected her to do. pat's foreign traveling did more than feed her desire for a venture visiting new places, it was a way of reconnecting with her husband and the team of old. he had never been more a part of his life and work than when they traveled together during the vice-presidential years. the circumstances unchanged. now they traveled with a huge entourage of aides, security personnel and reporters and feelings toward the u.s. had hardened over the years but her husband's faith and her abilities demonstrated by his willingness to send her off by herself must have gratified her. ec's the opportunities to prove herself. her trip to peru in 1970 he penalize her value as a foreign ambassador. on may 31st, 1970, and earthquake measuring 7.75 on the richter scale devastated half of peru killing at least 50,000 people and displacing hundreds of thousands of others. mudslides followed the initial quake causing further damage. homeless, injured and starv
and security a center of u.s. foreign policy debate. this was hosted by the center for strategic and international studies. >> let me take a employment to welcome and introduce admiral fallon skipping the part how he walked across the tidal basin to get here today. he's a very, very dear friend. he's had senior commands. he was, of course, the head of the central command, was the head of the pacific command. he was instrumental in opening up our relations with china and establishing new relations with india. he is in every sense the, you know, the diplomat warrior, what we most admire in our unified combat and commanders. thank you, bill, to you, for doing this, and let's turn it over to you. >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. [applause] first big step. thank you very much, and welcome, ladies and gentlemen. while we're getting settled here, i'll have our panelists come up and get settled into their chairs and order dessert, and those of you who missed the chow line, it may be too late. [laughter] then, again, i don't think too many in this room are starving, not the s
gets this foreign policy team together for a second term, not to mention the fact he would rather be focusing now on the fiscal cliff. >> and he is having a news conference tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. eastern from the white house. he is going to be bombarded with questions on this. not exactly the way he wanted to start that news conference, i am sure. thanks very much, gloria. >> sure. >>> she's the florida woman described by one source as bored, a bored, rich socialite. now jill kelley is caught up in this widening scandal. i will ask the head of the intelligence committee, dianne feinstein what she knows about this woman. my interview with senator feinstein next. >> her name has come into question, let me put it that way. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. but lately she's been coming in with less gray than usual. what's she up to? [ female announcer ]
bernstein, foreign economic policy adviser to vice president biden and senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities and wilbur ross is joining in with us, too, he's sticking around because we begged him too. we'll have more from all of them in a moment. first andrew has your morning headlines. >> we've got some earnings news this morning, dow component walmart reporting third quarter profit of $1.08 per share, one cent above estimates. revenues were light and full year forecast falling below street consensus. walmart saying an internal investigation has unveiled allegations of foreign corruption practices act in three more countries, so we're going to add china, india and brazil to the list, the issue first surfaced regarding walmart's mexico operation and there was an sec -- >> i had said before the company said in the release it's been informed by the doj and sec it's been the subject of investigation into possible violations of the foreign corrupt policies act, but it's the brazil, china and india aspects that changed the story a little. >> so the earnings plus that news pu
republican strategy? they are social, economic, and foreign policy, fully embracing each one. what we had was one wobbly leg with about $1 billion from the republican side from the top of the ticket and affecting every other senate race in the country because of that influence. when fully engaged, each of those policy areas, a real mandate is created, and there is a resonance that brings public policy leaders into office so those areas can be implemented, without fully engaging on each of those areas and social policy, we leave the votes on the table every single time. what we had was a factor truth on social issues on one side but a full embrace of the war on social issues on the other side. obama have launched a war over abortion and the life issue. therefore, he got to completely decide what the issue was, and what is it? rape. abortion and rape in the minds of many voters, because the debate was not fully engage. his weaknesses, is extreme positions on late storm abortions -- late term abortions, i'm not saving children born after a failed of abortion, none of these were explored in a
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)